The Fool

I think America’s present predicament is ample evidence of this phenomenon.

If you would like to see more of my drawings of The Orange Man, check out the series on POWER.

Drawing © Marty Coleman | napkindad.com

“He who is born a fool is never cured.” – anonymous

My Hope

myhope

 

My father and my mother taught me a very important thing about electing our President.

That is always, no matter if your side wins or loses, hope the best. Hope that the new President is better than what you think he is. Hope that the actions aren’t as severe as his rhetoric has been. Hope that the gravity of the office will infuse this person with a conscience you don’t believe he possesses. Hope that our system of government, with its checks and balances, will wear down the rough edges so people aren’t hurt by his actions and words.

I hope these things, not because I am naive, but because I believe it’s the best way for me personally to move forward as a citizen of the United States.

What do you think?

You Are Democracy – 2016

voting-2016_sm

It’s Simple

This is simple enough, right? We had a revolution unlike any in the history of the world so we could have control over our own government and those who do the governing. It’s never been perfect but its always been arching towards a more inclusive and complete democracy.  This 240 year old truth has been rare in the ongoing world of greedy autocrats and dictators.

We have a system that allows us to peacefully choose our leaders.  Don’t take it for granted, no matter what your political inclination. It doesn’t happen by accident.  It happens because we vote.

Make no excuses, get out and vote.


Drawing and commentary © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com

Quote is mine, an adaption of one by Walter H. Judd


Purchase the original | purchase a print | matte and frame available

Thanksgiving 2015

thanksgiving-2015_sm

Happy Thanksgiving

I know there are many in the US who do live on the edge of tragedy most every day. But I don’t think I am ignoring or diminishing their plight to say that overall we are blessed to be safe, secure and sustained at a level that exceeds most of the world. I am grateful for that and don’t take it for granted.


Drawing and commentary © 2015 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com

Quote by Paul Sweeney


 

The Promise Patriot – The American Journey #2

americanjourney2_2015_sm

Liberal

Many of you know I am a pretty liberal guy. I am liberal in my politics, outlook, style, humor, love, modesty, etc. You name it, I am probably more liberal than the the person next to me (at least in Oklahoma where I live!). However, if anyone would make the leap that that means I don’t love the country where I live as much as a conservative, they would be sorely wrong. 

Periscope International

Yesterday during the Periscope video I was broadcasting showing me actually drawing the drawing above we got into a discussion about America with some of my friends in the UK and elsewhere. I responded to something someone said by saying I am a Promise Patriot. I liked it and wrote it down so as to not forget it.

Promise Patriot

And that is what I am. I am a Promise Patriot. I believe in the promise that was at the heart of founding of the United States.  I believe it is still at our heart and I still believe in it.  This past month we saw that promise in action with the Supreme Court decision regarding marriage equality.  We are seeing it play out as well with the drawing down of the Confederate flag across the south and elsewhere.

What the Road Ahead Teaches

That also means I am not a blind patriot. I, as the founding mothers and fathers were, am a critical thinker patriot. I want us to ask hard questions. I want us to critique ourselves as if our lives depended on it.  I want us to realize we are not at the end of a journey but in the middle of one, and that we have to be open to what the road ahead teaches us, not just what the past has.


 

Vacation 2005

Ten years ago we took one of our first big vacations as a new family. As a matter of fact, Linda and I weren’t even engaged yet (that happened a month later) but we were bonding as family.  Linda, Caitlin and I went to visit my daughter Rebekah in Virginia and we went into the city of Washington D.C. for the 4th of July celebration at the Washington Monument.

Here are some pics from that day.
5DC_31

Looks like a Promise Patriot to me!  This was 10 years ago. Makes me wonder where he is today and what he looks like. Probably a straight-laced business man in a button down shirt, who knows!

5DC_21

My favorite photograph from that trip.  The Washington Monument behind the Jefferson Memorial.

5DC_38

Linda and Caitlin visiting with Abe.

5DC_28

Some random couple who were too attractive not to photograph.

5DC_29

The scene at the monument before the fireworks.

5DC_30

Linda and Rebekah listening to the band play patriotic music with the Lincoln Memorial in the distance with the World War II Memorial in between. 

 


Drawing, photos and commentary © 2015 Marty Coleman / napkindad.com

Quote by Rep. Barbara Jordan, 1936 – 1996, she was the first African American elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first southern black female elected to the United States House of Representatives

 


 

Inauguration Day 2013

Inauguration

Justice Requires Us
Justice Requires Us – A poster by the Napkin Dad on Zazzle.com
Hate

A lot of hate has infused itself in the politics of the last year, especially from the right. But it isn’t in a vacuum.  This round of hate has its roots, in part, in the election and reelection of George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004.  Many on the left were hateful towards that President just as many on the right are hateful now towards Obama.  I am not talking about disagreement or anger about policies. I am talking about irrational and destructive hate.

Left and Right

Both the left and the right who indulge in that level of vitriol and hate very likely have a short memory about their own anger at seeing the opposite pole be hateful before.  They said, and probably rightly so, those people are way off base. They just hate the guy, impugning his motives and promoting the idea that he has a set of diabolical plans to create a dictatorship or a corporate oligarchy or some other terrible thing.  People thought it of Bush and it wasn’t true and they think it of Obama and it isn’t true.  

Forgetting their Forebearers 

But there are those who are interested in something evil and un-American. They are those who, left or right, want to deny rights to those who are different than they are. It doesn’t matter if it’s a Muslim they think doesn’t deserve to be here in the US, a gay couple they think doesn’t deserve to be married, a woman they think doesn’t have the right to be a boss or a President, or a religious group who wants to live life a certain way. Those who believe those things, especially those who actively fight against those freedoms, are betraying America. The betray America because they have forgotten (if they ever knew it) that it was their own forebearers who founded the country on these very principles of freedom and rights.

____________________

Drawing and Commentary by Marty Coleman, who loves Inaugurations.

Quote by President Lyndon Johnson at his Inauguration as President, January 20th, 1965

____________________

Answer to the trivia question from yesterday

Question: Who replaced Napoleon as the leader of France?

Answer:  King Louis XVIII, who came from exile to rule from 1814-1824

America The Beautiful is Beautiful Today – 2012

Here is my 2012 ‘America the Beautiful is Beautiful Today’ napkin drawing.

america the beautiful 2012

 

Reaching

Are you reaching for the good in yourself and your country today?  No matter who you voted for, what color your skin is, who you love, how old you are, or what you have between  your legs, you are just as free today to pursue your dreams as you were yesterday. No election is going to take that away from you.  Pursue your dreams with passion and compassion and you will wake up 4 years from now, after another election, happier, healthier and with love in your heart.  It’s up to you.

_________________

Drawing and quote by Marty Coleman, Proud American always.

_________________

Four years ago today I drew the first napkin I had drawn since my youngest daughter (at the time) had graduated from high school 4 years earlier.  I drew the napkin because I couldn’t find an old napkin that said how I felt about the election of Barack Obama.  I made up the quote, drew it and posted it very quickly the morning after the election.  Back in that day I wasn’t on Facebook and Twitter didn’t exist. I posted it on my flickr.com site and on this blog, which I had started just at the beginning of 2008.  Here is that drawing.  This drawing is why I am the Napkin Dad today. I am very grateful I woke up that morning and decided to draw it.

america the beautiful 2008

_________________________

Gratitude – Election Day 2012

It doesn’t matter if you are in heels or work boots, male or female, tinted black, white, red, yellow, blue, green or gray, you get to vote today.

election day 2012

Proud To Be An American

I am never more proud to be an American than on Election Day.  It makes me think of our founding and the principles that were set forth then. I look back at history and feel blessed that we are descendents of a group of men and women who worked out a pretty audacious and untried plan to create a new type of nation and government.  They rebelled against all they knew for it. They lost their fortunes and their place in society for it. They lost their lives for it.  And it came into being, against odds not many would take.

Believing the Best

I was raised thinking politics and public service was a great thing. I still believe that. I don’t see all our officials as corrupt or stupid or greedy or conspiratorial.  I see them as people who have decided to see how they can help the rest of us.  That doesn’t mean some aren’t those things I just mentioned, some are. But even among those it doesn’t mean they didn’t start out wanting to do good.  As we see some fall and do bad, we kick them out and find others. But that doesn’t mean we give up on the rest and it doesn’t mean we should have the luxury of being stupid and simplistic ourselves about our nation and those who serve it in public office.

I don’t think they are selflessly altruistic either. They have mixed motives just as I do in my life. I am ok with that.  But I do think more about the unknown sacrifices they make then the unknown gains they might get.  I do think about the hard work they do for us, including all the arguing, all the fighting, all the emotional and practical compromises that they have to deal with every day.  I appreciate that and I respect them for dealing with it all for us. So today, I just don’t go vote. I think about, and am thankful for, those who have put themselves up for me to consider.

The Example of the Great George

I am thankful that our greatest President, George Washington set such a great example of the voluntary giving up of power. He did it not once, but many time, in war and in peace.  We have had example guide us for well over 200 years now. Every four years we see it in action.  I don’t know how many Americans truly realize what a great blessing it is that we have had this system that allows us to move ahead every four years without violence and overthrow.  It’s worth a moment to think about and be grateful for.

In the end, it’s easy. Go vote. It doesn’t matter if you are in a swing state or not. Your vote matters because you are part of a process that matters.

__________________

Drawing by Marty Coleman, who cast his first ballot in 1976.

__________________

Trivia question of the day

In 2008, President Obama was just the 3rd Senator to be elected President while still serving in the Senate. Who were the other two? By the way, McCain, had he won, would also have gone directly from the Senate to the White House.

__________________

The Opportunity to Play the Game – Olympics #3

Olympics Series – #3

The Opportunity to play

Heartbreak

I watched a lot of the American Olympic trials that were broadcast about a month before the games.  They are really more heartbreaking to me than the Olympics.  If you are at the Olympics, the heartbreak is falling short there.  But if you fall short at the trials, you watch the Olympics at home on TV like the rest of us.  For some, it’s disappointing, but they have been to the Olympics in years past and won something.  But for those who don’t get there the first time, and perhaps will now never get there, it is not just disappointing, it’s depressing.  

What they need, even more than some of the Olympians, is Olympic size courage. Courage to lay down one dream gently and pick up a new one, one for which they might not even know where to start looking. 

I admire greatly those who don’t make it after trying with all their might.  I always feel for them but I also always root them on to find a new dream.

____________________

Drawing by Marty Coleman, who has never been to the Olympics.

Quote by Mike Singletary

STOP SOPA

Stop Sopa

SOPA is a US House bill 3261 (PIPA is the senate version) calling for stronger anti-piracy accountability on the internet.  The original idea has some merits of course, many countries are rampant with piracy of movies and music that hurts American and other entertainment companies. I have no problem with them wanting to protect their intellectual and creative property, just as I want to protect mine.

The problem is that the bill is overkill. It allows corporations to shut down alleged violator’s websites without any due process or review from a neutral authority.  That can, and you can bet will, lead to the capricious and damaging use of that power.  A big multi-national corporation that just happens to not like the information and creativity on a website could easily put pressure on the host/provider, with legal backing, to close down the supposedly offensive site. Their ‘sin’ could be parody, or whistleblowing or creative sampling. Who knows. The point is that we want to protect intellectual rights. But we also want to protect creative and intellectual freedom and we can’t do that unless our laws follow guidelines that do not allow for abuse by those in power.

STOP SOPA.

Drawing and commentary by Marty Coleman

Photographic Sunday – Travels

I love road trips.  When I was very small we moved from one side of the country to the other a number of times.  We did it again when I was a teenager. I did it twice during undergraduate and graduate years and once again as an adult with a family.  Those were just the moves.  The road trips include journeys to the North, Northeast, Northwest, South, Southeast and Southwest all from Oklahoma, the middle coast of the USA.


Here are some of the photographs I have taken on the journeys.


Piranha Beef Jerky in Nebraska


 The Old Church – the Badlands, South Dakota


Vermeer Discovery – Plimoth Plantation, Massachusetts


Dunes – Cape Cod, Massachusetts


On The Other Side – Grand Canyon, Arizona


Sunset among Friends – Del Mar, California


Stressed Mother – DisneyWorld, Florida


Self-Portrait Tired in a DisneyWorld Bathroom,  Florida


The Hot Cheerleader – Baylor University – Waco, Texas


The Grandson – Rural Oklahoma


Photographic Sunday – Landscapes

I spend most of my camera time taking photographs of people.  But I also love taking landscape/nature photos. 


Here are some of my landscape/nature photos over the years. 


Flint Creek in Fog

New Life Ranch – Colcord, Oklahoma

My daughters went to camp here for many years.  We also went to family camp a number of times as well.  It was down in a valley so the fog would often settle in pretty thick in the mornings. 



Cadillacs and Barbed Wire

Amarillo, Texas

The Cadillac Ranch is an art installation in an empty field west of Amarillo. We always try to stop there on our drives to California as sort of a pilgrimage.  



Sunrise as if I was on the plains of Africa

Glenpool, Oklahoma

Amazingly enough, this scene was out my back door.



Infinity Marsh

Cape Cod, Massachusetts

It was a perfect day for a marsh visit; cool, overcast, misty, and humid.



 

The City and the Mountains

Seattle and the Olympic mountain range at dusk

We had a tourist pass to a number of sites in Seattle, including 2 trips up the Space Needle.  The girls weren’t interested in going a second time so I went by myself with my camera at dusk.



 

Golden Gate Silhouette

San Francisco, California

My family has a long history in the San Francisco Bay Area. I first went across the bridge when I was perhaps 11 or 12 years old to visit my cousin who lived in Marin County just to the north of it.  I lived in SF and San Jose (south of there) for a number of years and went over the bridge many times, walking and driving.  This was a new view for me though. We took a ferry to Sausalito and Angel Island. I was able to see the bridge in relationship to the shore, hills and homes along the route in ways I had not seen before.



Composition with Saguaro Skeleton

Saquaro National Park – Tucson, Arizona

My daughter and I went to San Diego to pick up a car that my father was giving to us. On the drive home through Arizona we stopped at the National Park.  Caitlin started her love affair with Cacti at that time.



 

Curve of the Earth with Dead Tree

Capulin Volcano National Monument – New Mexico

A little known spot in the scheme of all the great national parks and monuments, Capulin Volcano is a perfect circular cone volcano that you can walk up.  The view from the top, with nothing but flat land all around, was pretty spectacular.


Landscape with Birds, Tree and Horses

Broken Arrow, Oklahoma

One doesn’t have to go far from home in Oklahoma to see scenes like this.  This spot was just about a mile from my old house.



If you would like to see more of my landscape photographs head on over to my flickr.com landscape collection.All photos © Marty Coleman – All rights reserved.

Patriotism Test

I posted this drawing and this self-test of patriotism last year.

What would you add?

Mediocre in this instance means average, NOT sub-par.
Here is my self-test of patriotism.  These statements are how I know I am living up to the ideals of our founders.
  1. When I understand that America is not only for people like me. 
  2. When I understand that I am free to judge on the content of character, but not the color of skin or the gender of the body or the inclinations of love and attraction or the ability to do what others can do,  or one’s upbringing or station in life. 
  3. When I understand that each individual has the inalienable right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, whether I like their versions of those things or not. 
  4. When I understand we have a right to be free and pursue our dreams but NOT at the expense and destruction of our towns, coastlines, rivers, oceans, land, air or people. 
  5. When I understand we have an absolute right to protect ourselves from those who wish or do us harm, or whose actions unknowingly cause us harm, from outside or inside our country, from individuals or corporations. 
  6. When I understand with gratefulness and humility that many people, now and in the past, have found it necessary to do something they hate doing, namely killing other people, and in turn sometimes getting killed and wounded themselves, to protect these rights and to protect me. 
  7. When I understand that hating another country or another people will not now, or ever, create a safe environment for me and mine. 
  8. When I understand that civil discourse and transitions among people and governing authorities who disagree is essential and positive, leading to good governance and progress. 
  9. When I understand and stand up for true religious freedom, knowing that my religion (or lack of) is not the religion of the country, no matter how large and powerful it is, and no matter how many believe as I do. 
  10. When I understand that America is me and what I do with my life.

That is my test for myself.

 

What would you add to it?

 

It’s Rhetorical #3 – Red, White and Blue

 

Give your favorite politician this coffee cup

Americans are taught, from an early age, the words of those who founded the country.  The rhetoric still guides us.  Not just the Constitution and the Declaration, but in the wide swath of words our leaders, elected or not, have spoken.  We love those words.  People on the right, like Rep. John Boehner, people on the left, like Rep. Nancy Pelosi, and people in the middle, like Rep. Gabrielle Giffords,  love them. They take them to heart even as they have slightly different opinions of what those words mean in the here and now.  But, as naive as some say it is, I believe American politicians, with rare exceptions, do their best to honor those good words from our history.  


I don’t start with that assumption regarding those who are not accountable.  I am talking about specific people, on both the left and right; Beck, Limbaugh, Maddow, Olbermann, Maher, Hannity, Savage, O’Reilly, Palin and others.  They don’t have to be elected, sworn in, questioned by constituents.  All they have to do is talk.  They are responsible to themselves, their companies and the company’s shareholders.  They are not responsible to the citizens.  If what they want is money, fame & adulation there is nothing wrong with them wanting those things. They are not responsible to want anything else even though we might hope they have deeper desires.


What is wrong is when you think they have your best interests at heart. They don’t. They have THEIR best interests at heart.  They are NOT your representatives, in life or in Congress. Listen but understand that YOU are responsible for not just your words but how you evaluate and act on other people’s words as well.
…………………………………………………..


Drawing and commentary by Marty Coleman of The Napkin Dad Daily


Quote by Plato, 427-348 BCE, Greek philosopher



Sketchbook History Tour, 1996 – Four Interesting Portraits

 

kathywithrain_sm

A Woman with Rain on Her Shoulder

A portrait of my first wife, K.  We were married for 20+ years (1979-2000).  She had her moments of being bummed about things and I was visualizing one of those little moments in this drawing.

madeinamerica_sm

This was in my very small sketchbook I carried with me at the time.  2″ x 3″  Probably I started to draw this woman and she moved after I had just done her profile.  So instead of figuring out the back of her head I just made her into a giant sculpture in a parking lot watching a rocket take off.  Made sense at the time!

husbandwifeblock_sm

Wife and Husband with A Block Between Them

I met the woman at church and drew her from behind.  I heard her talking about marital issues and I imagined an actual block between her and her husband.

womaninbathreading_sm_1996

The Bather

I almost never cross hatch using color so this was an interesting exercise for me. I was especially fun because I was trying to work in the water covering part of her.

 

Drawings © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com

Seattle Road Trip – Day 5 – Deep Thoughts & the Barista

Deep Thoughts and the Barista
 
We have arrived in Seattle, our final road trip destination!  My daughter has been a barista for quite some time, as well as a coffee roaster, office manager, and everything else in the coffee business.  So, of course the first thing we did when arriving in Seattle was to hit a nice coffee house!  I drew this after meeting a barista who didn’t quite look like this (she was happier looking) and having a conversation with Chelsea about obligation.  I couldn’t think of a way to succinctly ‘quote’ our conversation so I did a little question/riddle type thing.  Coffee will do that to you, you know. 
Anyway, the goal has been achieved and she is now off to start her new life!  
I am on to visit family in San Diego for a few days before heading home.
 

Marty

Seattle Road Trip – Day 2 – Buffalo, Wyoming

 

My first brown napkin ever!  Got it at the Super 8 Motel at breakfast in Buffalo, Wyoming after a day getting to Badlands National Park JUST as the sun set!  But we found an ultra cool abandoned church and took some pics there.
 
 
 And just a few minutes later we got into the park and got to see some bison and witness the sunset. It was gorgeous.  We even got a pic of us at just the right moment!
 
 
 
Next stop, Yellowstone National Park!
 

Drawing and photos (all from my iPhone, ‘good’ pics from my camera to come later) by Marty Coleman of The Napkin Dad Daily.

>What Makes A Nation Great

>

Today we celebrate the birth of the United States of America 234 years ago.  

Who likes the idea of being mediocre?  Not me.  But I do like the idea that the millions and millions of average people are the deciding factor in whether a nation is great.  Yes, it’s wonderful to have fantastic leaders and great managers and genius artists and fabulous engineers who lead the way.  But most of us don’t live in a world surrounded by fame and greatness every day. We live in our neighborhoods with average folk.  Who they are, who you are, that is what defines America.


You can read my post from yesterday on how I test myself to see if I am living up to what I consider to be American standards.  

Drawing and commentary by Marty Coleman of The Napkin Dad Daily


Quote by Jose Ortega y Gasset, 1883-1955, Spanish author and philosopher

>My Patriotism Test

>

I love my country.  In most cases I probably love your country too.  But I love my country because the ideals it was founded on.  Those ideals are not well protected and maintained if you only rise up and believe them once a year on the 4th of July.  They are nourished when you do it every day.


Here is my self-test of patriotism.  These statements are how I know I am living up to the ideals of our founders.

  1. When I understand that America is not only for people like me.
  2. When I understand that I am free to judge on the content of character, but not the color of skin or the gender of the body or the inclinations of love and attraction or the ability to do what others can do,  or one’s upbringing or station in life.
  3. When I understand that each individual has the inalienable right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, whether I like their versions of those things or not.
  4. When I understand we have a right to be free and pursue our dreams but NOT at the expense and destruction of our towns, coastlines, rivers, oceans, land or people.
  5. When I understand we have an absolute right to protect ourselves from those who wish or do us harm, both from outside our country and our corporations, and from inside.
  6. When I understand with gratefulness and humility that many people, now and in the past, have found it necessary to do something they hate doing, namely killing other people, and in turn sometimes getting killed and wounded themselves, to protect these rights and to protect me.
  7. When I understand that hating another country or another people will not now, or ever, create a safe environment for me and mine.
  8. When I understand that civil discourse and transitions among people and governing authorities who disagree is essential and positive, leading to good governance and progress.
  9. When I understand and stand up for true religious freedom, knowing that my religion (or lack of) is not the religion of the country, no matter how large and powerful it is, and no matter how many believe as I do.
  10. When I understand that America is me and what I do with my life.

That is my test.  
What would you add to it?

Drawing and commentary by Marty Coleman of The Napkin Dad Daily


Quote by Adlai Stevenson, 1900-1965, Governor of Illinois, Ambassador to the UN, Presidential candidate 1952 & 1956.

Separation of Church and State – updated 2017

The country I am from, the US, has a long history of this separation. It is constantly being questioned and sometimes people want to rewrite our history to say we don’t really have this separation, but the truth is we do, and it’s always been there. I believe it is a good thing.

What about those of you in other countries? How does it work where you are from? Do you like it like that or would you like a different system?
 
Drawing and commentary © Marty Coleman
 
“I’m completely in favor of the separation of church and state. My idea is that they both screw us up enough on their own, so them together is certain death.” – George Carlin, 1937-2008, American comedian
 
 

Particular Care and Attention – updated 2017

This is the 5th and final day of the feminism series. I hope you have enjoyed them and have passed them on if you were so inclined.

Who wrote this? Some radical, wild-eyed commie pinko feminist of the 20th century? No, it was Abigail Adams, wife of our 2nd President, John Adams. Obviously from the quote you can surmise she was not alone in this statement. The ‘We’ she is talking about were New England women, raised in a relatively traditional religious atmosphere.

But they were as smart and educated as their husbands. Maybe not in formal schooling, but they read the same books of the enlightenment. They read the same pamphlets. They saw the same spirit of liberty and equality rising up as their husbands saw.

But they knew that the liberty did not really extend to them. They knew lip service was given, but that is not liberty. They knew some men were inclined to agree with them, but that is not liberty.

Standing up for yourself and your cause is the act that forces those who are not voluntarily willing to give liberty to all to give it anyway. Adams didn’t see the day, nor did her daughter or granddaughter. Maybe her Great granddaughter did. But however long it took, you can see it now. Are you grateful for that? Are you aware of the blessing?

I am not talking to women here. I am talking to men and women. I am a man, but I have no interest in living in a world where half of the population, in many ways the smarter half, don’t have a voice, don’t have a vote and can’t contribute as they should be able.

Just don’t forget our history.

Drawing and commentary © Marty Coleman

 “If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and we will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.” – Abigail Adams, 1744-1818, American mother, wife, writer, political adviser, revolutionary, activist

In the Long Run – updated 2017

Is this true of a dictatorship I wonder?
Is it true of the people in a nation who have no voice, can’t or don’t vote due to personal or societal restraints?

What would be the symbol of your country?

Tell me here.

Drawing and commentary © Marty Coleman

“In the long run every government is the exact symbol of its people, with their wisdom and their unwisdom.” – Thomas Carlyle, 1795-1881, Scottish writer

Thanksgiving, Like Contentment – updated 2017

This Thanksgiving I am going to be thankful for, along with the usual suspects of family, friends, health and safety, contentment. That I am either content with who I am and what I do, or I am taking action that will lead to that contentment.
Sit and be content this week.

Drawing and commentary © Marty Coleman

“Thanksgiving, like contentment, is a learned attribute. The person who hasn’t learned to be content lives with the delusion he deserves more or something better.” – Robert Flatt

I Love America – updated 2017

For my friends from outside the USA, you are invited to enjoy a drawing
of our
4th of July fireworks celebrating our independence from Great Britain
in 1776, 233 years ago. For my friends within the USA, take this as me
sitting beside you while you watch the fireworks, wherever you are.

We usually watch the 4th of July fireworks along the banks of the Arkansas
River in Tulsa, Oklahoma. There is a city park that stretches the length of the
river and they shoot the fireworks from a bridge that makes it easy for
everyone to see. I love America.

This year we will be in Boston for the celebration. It is one of the cradles
of our country and we are very excited about being there for the 4th. Along the
Charles River separating Cambridge from Boston we will sit and listen
to the Boston Pops Orchestra play as they have for a zillion years. The
1812 Overture will be played with cannons being let loose from the river and
bells of the churches of Boston ringing along side them. I love America.

Wherever you are, think about not just the issues of America, but the idea of
America. Just as we as individuals have our ideals that we sometimes do not
live up to, so it is with our country. But it doesn’t mean we don’t have the
ideals and it doesn’t mean we are not working towards their fulfillment.
I love America.

I am grateful, very grateful, I had ancestors that seized the moment and made
the US happen. I love America.

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